Five of the Best Playstation Games Ever Made

A summary of five of the best PSX Games ever produced.
5: Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back – 1997

Like its 1996 predecessor, Crash Bandicoot, this fun-packed sequel is filled to the brim with super-deformed cartoon decadence. Unlike the first game, however, Crash Bandicoot 2 is more well organized in its level layouts. Utilizing five distinct “warp rooms,” with five stages located within each room, the player is able to select a level rather than play them through in a linear fashion.

This time around, Crash must find glowing purple crystals from each playable level. Upon obtaining five in a given warp room, he must proceed to take part in a respective boss battle. The bosses in this game did require some level of creative thinking to defeat, which of course added to the overall fun factor. Ultimately, Crash must head on up to the space station of his arch nemesis, Dr. Neo Cortex, and take him on as well.

With the Naughty Dog team’s clever utilization of creative level design, layout and game-play mechanics, this colorful classic absolutely hit the nail on the head in terms of an interactive good time.

4: Driver: You Are The Wheelman – 1999

A thrilling take on classic 1960s and 70s car chase films, Driver: You Are The Wheelman took the genre to gaming like never before. Players take on a character named Tanner, and drive undercover in a menagerie of cities such as Miami and San Francisco. Although the premise sounds simple enough, avoiding the police and getting tasks done on time prove to be quite a challenge.

Requiring a good deal of thought (and failures) to follow through with given objectives, Driver was indeed an interesting game to complete. It did warrant more than one sequel after all. And what’s more, a few cheats punched in to help along with the adventure, such as negating the cops being an issue, definitely upped the game’s overall fun factor substantially. Driver: You Are The Wheelman was a great way to get the adrenaline pumping.

3: Gex 3: Deep Cover Gecko – 1999

Before the turn of the new millennium, Crystal Dynamics proved that the third time is indeed the charm with the delightful sequel to Gex: Enter The Gecko. In Gex 3: Deep Cover Gecko, players can dive into levels filled with television and movie parodies. In addition, Gex himself dons suitable apparel for the stage in question.

The goal of this installment is to save the live-action Agent Xtra (played by Baywatch’s Marliece Andrada) from Rez’s grasp by teleporting into interesting takes on pop culture such as Japanese animation and Christmas. And collecting remote controls in order to advance to higher and more difficult stages. In addition to the main levels, the player also has access to bonus levels played in order to obtain special passwords for unlockables later in the game.

Overall Gex 3 in all of its politically incorrect goodness was definitely worth putting into the now old-school PSX library.

2: The Legend of Dragoon – 2000

Definitely one of the most innovative games of the past decade, The Legend Of Dragoon kicked things up a notch in the RPG realm. In addition to its fascinating take on turn-based role-playing, this four-disc classic boasted one of the most diverse group of characters one game has ever yielded. In addition to a very assorted cast, the title also features quite the varied world as well.

Spanning just about every climate imaginable merely sets the perfect backdrop for the game’s superb kicker, the Dragoons. More powerful forms of the playable characters capable of extraordinary feats of might and magic. And what’s more is that each character/Dragoon controls his or her own element, such as fire, water, light and darkness.

The power of attacks ultimately depends on the player’s ability to keep up with the rhythm of pressing the right button at the right time. This game was and still is a great challenge to say the least. But it would be a horrible crime to have never played it at all.

1: Final Fantasy VII – 1997

Who could forget what some call the greatest game ever made? If you’ve never heard of Final Fantasy VII by now, chances are you’ve been living in a cave on Mars for almost 13 years. The classic struggle of Cloud Strife and his AVALANCHE team to save the planet from a former colleague set a superb story. But more so technologically innovative was Square soft’s (now Square Enix) no-short-of-genius utilization of the Playstation’s capabilities for the now common pre-rendered cut scene.

The only drawback to the first 3D installment of the now long-running series, is only being able to use three characters at a time. And that’s if you really consider that a drawback. Ultimately Final Fantasy VII – what many consider to be the best Final Fantasy game – is definitely a title that has stood the test of time and will for years to come.

Top 10 Atari Games Ever Made

Atari made some of the very fist and best video games. Many of these games went on to be remade into games we enjoy today, and some just remained classics that every little kid loved to play. Wether they were re-made or preserved in their classic state, here is a list of the top ten Atari Games ever made
10) Battlezone (1980) Is the first real attempt at a 3-D game. Atari’s Battlezone features a large and relatively empty flat space surrounded by mountains and other fun things to shoot at. I know many players (me included)tried to abandon the shooting and explore the extent of Atari’s virtual landscape, but I always received a nice reminder from a missile as to the real purpose of the game. This game paved the way for many similar games ten and twenty years later including Star Fox.

9) Space Invaders (1980) was another classic and definitely deserves to be on the Top Ten Atari games list. This game was one of the biggest hits in arcade days, and some argue it even caused a yen shortage in Japan. Whether that is true or not, one thing is certain, this game is the addictive foundation for many games that came in the following years. Space Invaders had quite a following in the early Atari days-it was the game that first launched the Atari into many American homes.

8) Paperboy (1984) This game goes without an introduction. Paperboy was (and still is) one of my favorite games. Somehow Atari turned delivering papers into something every little kid thought was worth paying for in the arcade. This game also had really good looking graphics (for Atari) and sound to accompany them. When it comes to fun, there aren’t very many Atari games better than Paperboy. It was surprisingly difficult however, I don’t remember ever beating this game, but I didn’t mind starting over to play it again.

7) Adventure (1979) was one of the older games made for the Atari, and the first action adventure game. In this game you roam around a series of mazes searching for a chalice while avoiding three dragons. This simple strategy sold over one million units early on in Atari days. This game is also famous for a handful of corks and unique niceties. The dragons in the game look more like ducks, which seems to take away a little bit from the terror of exploring a long maze, but it didn’t take away from the fun. Another notable achievement in this game is the first Easter Egg. Atari (this was on the 2600 now) would not let the designer publish his name at the end of the game for credit, so he hid his name in the game.

6) Centipede (1980) Was the second highest selling game in Atari’s history. On a side not, Centipede was also the first game to be co-designed by a woman, and attracted a large female following. Centipede is very similar to space invasion, only the player shoots a centipede which moves down the screen and breaks into smaller pieces, rather than shooting a large number of ships moving in formation.

5) Star Wars (1983) This was the first in a long line of Star Wars games starting at the Atari. Notably this game had excellent sound and good looking vector graphics that put the player right in the middle of an exciting space battle flying an x-wing. As Luke in his x-wing, you fly around the universe defeating tie fighters with realistic sounds pulled right out of the movie. If Star Wars didn’t have a big enough following already, this game certainly helped fans on board.

4) Pitfall (1982) Is one of the more simple games made for Atari. The player is given the task of running across the screen and jumping over tar pits, scorpions, and crocodiles. This game was addictive and fun and many a player spent hours perfecting their jump. This game was also very popular to the general public, (possibly the most popular game on Atari’s 2600) Selling over four million copies.

3) Asteroids (1979) was another spaced themed shooter. Unlike the other space shooters for the Atari however, Asteroids was the top selling game in Atari history, and the best selling game in the vector graphics era. Perhaps part of this was due to the fact that Asteroids was the first game to allow players to enter their initials on a high score ranking system. This created a competitive aspect of the game that was reproduced by many games to come. Other than that, it was a fun move your ship at a different angle and shoot game.

2) Pong (1972) Pong was not the first video game ever designed (surprising I know, but the first game was a little known space game), but it was the first video game to receive real success, and bring Atari into the industry. Two paddles and a ball are all you need to play this game (or more realistically a left and right button) but this provided hours of entertainment for the video game industry’s first consumers.

1) Gauntlet (1985) was the first attempt at an RPG (role playing game). This famous Atari game featured a warrior class, and Elf, Valkyrie, and Wizard class that explore a dungeon and kill everything in sight. This game was fun to play with up to 3 other people and could be cooperative, or competitive (depending on how much food there is for the player with the lowest amount of life). This game was incredibly fun to play with many players in the arcade, but Atari didn’t realize it’s multiplayer potential until much later. The reason this game makes number one on the list, is not because it sold the most copies, but because it is the most innovative and fun. You can almost literally quest forever after monsters in more dungeons slaying the forces of evil. The four different character classes added a nice variety to the game, and the multiplayer aspect drove it home.

Left 4 Dead 2: The Zombie Killing Game You Can’t Help but Love

Every year since Doom was first released there has been a FPS Survival game made. Some of the famous recent releases are Quake IV, Doom3, and Dead Space. What do they all have in common? They are single player. Then out came valve with this novel concept of making the survival genre to include multiplayer games where it is you and your friends versus the computer and even cooler, you and the computer versus your friends and the computer. The game was a hit and everyone was playing it before long, especially on the Xbox 360. The logical thing to do once you have made a great game – turn it into a sequel.That is exactly what valve did and they decided on a simple name, “Left 4 Dead 2”.
Graphics:

I want to get this one out of the way at the beginning. The graphics are kind of bad considering the year it was released. This is due to the large number of random zombies that have to be spawned in Left 4 Dead 2, were the graphics better than there would be significant lag

If you have ever played the original Left 4 Dead then you will be happy to know that while the graphics are far from Doom 3, they are a nice improvement over the first game. There are still spots where the player and the ground appear “apart” and the player is moon walking. Overall, the graphics rarely ever distract from the gameplay.

Sound:

This is a game that was never meant to be played while others are trying to eat. From vomiting noises to the sound of flesh being torn off of a body, Left 4 Dead 2 offers one of the most grotesque and horrifying sound effects to ever be offered in a survival game.

Gameplay:

The main selling point of this series, the gameplay is the only one of its kind. This is the first time a company has ever offered you the chance to team up with your bodies and just try to survive (a new mode in Left 4 Dead 2 also). By allowing you to work more as a team rather than a one versus an army setup, it allows Left 4 Dead 2 to be much more fun to replay. Depending on who you play with it can feel like a different game every time.

The other great part to Left 4 Dead 2 is the online play. You and a “guest” can get online and play as a two man team to face other humans. You will play one round like normal trying to defend yourself against the zombies (some of which are humans) and then you replay the level as the zombies themselves. You and your friend will be various “special zombies” with unique abilities designed to kill the humans. Up to 8 players will compete in 4v4 gameplay with the computer replacing any empty slots.

This competition of both surviving longer and doing more damage will lead to hours of playing amongst your friends. Left 4 Dead 2 will show you who did the most damage and who lasted longer allowing you to compete about more than just what the game scores.

Overall:

A great sequel to one of the best games ever made. It only adds things and doesn’t take anything away. It has everything from new monsters to new weapons. Left 4 Dead 2 adds new modes and many other reasons to think of it as its own game rather than a cool expansion pack. It is available for both the PC and the Xbox 360 and a must buy.

Video Game Cliches Pt. 2

Ever get the feeling of Deja vu? The unmistakable sensation that you have seen or done something before…This is part two of a two part series, that feeling is natual in this case.
Enemies carry food/weapons.
this may very well be the most common cliche in video games. Those mindless drones deployed by the games antagonist often carry health items and weapons. Seeing as these enemies lack advanced combat skills, they are basically nothing more than walking item containers.

You defeat the beast then you steal the lunch he was saving for later. Why does that Orc(using a stupid club by the way) have rare uber items needed to beat the final boss? Perhaps it just likes to collect shiny things…or needs to pay off debt to the mob?

Amnesia.
This is just so much of an annoyance, it isn’t even funny. All RPG fans know how this bit goes. Dorkish video game character has no idea who he is or why he’s in a strange town to begin with. Regardless of that, tumbleweed for brains is willing to defy impossible odds to save the world anyway!

To say this is over used in games would be like saying Fuji is a moderatly sized mountain. As most RPG’s rely heavaly on story, you can pretty much tell its a dud if amnesia is mentioned even once. Exceptions to the rule? sure there are, but for some strange and unexplainable reason I fail to remember anything.

World War II.
Normally sequals don’t come close exceeding beyond the impact of the originals. The events of Dubya-Dubya Two saw destruction on a grand scale. The underdogs known as the Allied forces eventially defeated the Axis alliance in a war that featured a death count still unmatched in any war since.

People who buy anything related to WWII should fall into a deep coma for about a year or three. We all know the locations and ending by now. How many times do you need to storm the freaking beaches of freaking Normandy before you freaking tire of the freaking repetition? Seriously, its getting old so stop supporting it.